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Unlikely Rainbows

Menka Sanghvi
Menka Sanghvi
2 min read
Unlikely Rainbows
Rainbow in bathroom. Seen by Bee

Those big rainbows in the sky after a sun shower are actually pretty rare sightings. But smaller, everyday rainbows can be found in the most unlikely places. If only we pause to look. And, thanks to frequency illusion (technically known as the Baader-Meinhof Phenomenon) once you see one the chances of seeing them more often increases. Perhaps we can simulate the frequency illusion by looking at this collection below.

Please do send over any more you find so we can grow this collection: hello@wearejustlooking.org.

Seen by Lori. "Light came in the window and went through my water bottle and made a rainbow on the floor."
Seen by me Menka Sanghvi. "May many rainbows fall at your feet!"
Seen by Maryln Muir. "Morning reflection"
Seen by Theresa King. "Effect caused by sun and plants."
Seen by Jeni Pearsons. "Carwash!"
Seen by Jacob Berger. "Garden spider weaving rainbows"
Seen by Kat Morgan. "Whoops" 
Essays

Menka Sanghvi Twitter

I'm a researcher, writer, and designer working on the theme of mindful curiosity. Just Looking is a project I started to help myself and others slow down and experience more wonder in the everyday.


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